Class Recap

Foods that Heal Inflammation

This was the first real rainy fall day I’ve experienced here in Seattle. We are pulling the green tomatoes from the garden and clearing it for another season of planting. The soil will appear to be asleep through the winter, but we know that there is an entire world of incests, fungus and microorganisms that will be busy under the surface.

Nutrition

Keri Romerdahl

In honor of breast cancer awareness month, the Well Being Center has been running a campaign designed to build awareness around cancer reduction, which is now being considered a metabolic disease, versus a genetic disease. This invites us to consider things we can do to reduce our risk factors.

All imbalances in the body, that can lead to disease if not corrected, start with inflammation. So the menu was a collection of some of the most potent anti-inflammatory foods we can consume.

Salmon – Fatty fish are an excellent source of omega-3 fatty acids, which are known to lower chronic inflammation.

Green vegetables/herbs – frisee, collard greens, cilantro and parsley contain antioxidants and polyphenols that help to significantly reduce inflammation.

Avocado – a rich source of vitamin E, a micronutrient with anti-inflammatory properties

Olive oil – contains nutrients called polyphenols, which prevent the release of inflammatory compounds

Quinoa – technically a seed vs a grain and is packed with fiber that helps produce butyrate, a fatty acid that turns off genes related to inflammation and insulin resistance.

Harvard Women’s Health Watch. (2015). Foods that fight inflammation. Harvard Medical School. Retrieved from: http://www.health.harvard.edu/staying-healthy/foods-that-fight-inflammation

Tea

Holy Basil:
Holy basil is so good for boosting up the immune system that it is hard to describe it in words. It protects against nearly all infections from viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa. Recent studies show that it is also helpful in inhibiting the growth of HIV and  carcinogenic cells.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3249909/?&utm_medium=367
Ginger:
According to the USDA National Nutrient Database, it is also rich in carbohydrates,
dietary fiber, and protein. In terms of minerals, it has sodium, iron, potassium, magnesium, phosphorus, and zinc. Vitamins in it include vitamin C, folate, vitamin B6, riboflavin, and niacin. Ginger is known to inhibit bacterial, viral, and fungal infection, owing to the presence of gingerol in it. It also helps in maintaining oral health by killing the pathogens in the mouth and keep the teeth and gums intact. [42] Its antibacterial properties help wards off pathogenic bacteria that cause urinary tract infection (UTI),
bronchitis, and pneumonia.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18814211?&utm_medium=259
Cinnamon:
Due to its antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral, and antiseptic properties, it is effective for treating external as well as internal infections. It helps in destroying germs in the gallbladder and the bacteria present in staph infections. Honey and cinnamon paste is good for boosting the immune system, eliminating chronic fatigue, and increasing the lifespan of people. It can also be used for treating colds and influenza. This is partially due to the antioxidants found in both honey and cinnamon which can combine
to combat the free radicals in the body’s organ systems.
https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0378874107002474&utm_medium=239

Immune Support Tea

Recipes

Frisee Salad with Chanterelles & Mustard

Avocado Toast with Radish & Cilantro

Quinoa with Herbs & Spices

Apple Wood Smoked Salmon

Mustard Greens with Rosemary & Garlic

Frisee Salad with Chanterelles & Mustard

serves: 10

Avocado Toast with Radish & Cilantro

serves: 10

Quinoa with Herbs & Spices

serves: 10

Apple Wood Smoked Salmon

serves: 10

Mustard Greens with Rosemary & Garlic

serves: 10