Class Recap

Astringent Flavor Profile

I used to make tians at a very french restaurant about 15 years ago, and I have to say I didn’t really like them very much; they were soggy, under seasoned vegetables that lacked any real direction. I thought it was a lot of work for a boring dish – that was until I had one at Chez Panisse. This tian was delicate layers of roasted tomatoes, squash and onions all tossed with a briny salsa verde and topped with the spiciest arugula I have ever eaten. I was a changed man.

Nutrition

Keri Romerdahl

Completing our deep dive through the Ayurvedic flavor profiles – we finish with astringent.  According to Ayurveda, astringent is drying and cool.  It is an excellent antidote to congestion and excess mucus, and functions as a natural anti-inflammatory. It has a binding quality, which tends to compress and hold tissues together, which promotes body cohesiveness.  People that need to balance Kapha and Pitta, generally need more bitter and astringent foods in their diets.

Recipes

Braised Cauliflower with Leeks & Olives

Squash & Tomato Tian with Salsa Verde

Roasted Mustard Greens with Rosemary & Chive Flowers

Braised Chickpeas with Horseradish

Braised Cauliflower with Leeks & Olives

serves: 10

Squash & Tomato Tian with Salsa Verde

serves: 10

Roasted Mustard Greens with Rosemary & Chive Flowers

serves: 10

Braised Chickpeas with Horseradish

serves: 10